© Dave Immel
YourCarSalesman.com Dave Immel Automotive Consultant
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282 E. Wolf Run, Mukwonago WI 53149 262-378-3595
From Farm to Car Going green is nothing new for Ford
Posted Monday October 26, 2015
Henry Ford was a pioneer Henry Ford always recognized the importance of agriculture to the economy of the United States – and the role it could play in the manufacture of vehicles.  By 1940, a soybean processing plant had been added to the company’s massive Rouge complex.
The Soybean Car (1941) Henry Ford combined his background in agriculture with his love for automotive business when he created the Soybean Car.  In response to a metal shortage at the time, Henry developed a new plastic car made of soybeans, flax and other natural materials that improved durability and was 1,000 pounds lighter than traditional steel models.
From Farm to Car Since 2000, Ford’s biomaterials team have been working on making sustainable car parts from the farm.  Byproducts from common crops like tomatoes, soybeans and wheat straw help Ford Motor Company make plant-based components strong enough to compete against conventional ones.  Since 2008, Ford has put soy foam seats into more than 15 million vehicles in North America.  Today Ford uses soybean-based foam cushions in all North American vehicles – saving approximately 5 million pounds of petroleum annually.
Video from The Henry Ford Museum located in Dearborn MI. In this video from “The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation” series, you’ll learn about soybeans and how Henry Ford harvested them into a variety of uses.
Ford Motor Company's plastics research engineer, Angela Harris, answers a few questions about Ford soy foam at the 2011 Farm Progress Show.
YourCarSalesman.com
© Dave Immel
Dave Immel’s website 282 E. Wolf Run, Mukwonago WI 53149 262-378-3595
From Farm to Car Going green is nothing new for Ford
Posted Monday October 26, 2015
Henry Ford was a pioneer Henry Ford always recognized the importance of agriculture to the economy of the United States – and the role it could play in the manufacture of vehicles.  By 1940, a soybean processing plant had been added to the company’s massive Rouge complex.
Video from The Henry Ford Museum located in Dearborn MI. In this video from “The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation” series, you’ll learn about soybeans and how Henry Ford harvested them into a variety of uses.
The Soybean Car (1941) Henry Ford combined his background in agriculture with his love for automotive business when he created the Soybean Car.  In response to a metal shortage at the time, Henry developed a new plastic car made of soybeans, flax and other natural materials that improved durability and was 1,000 pounds lighter than traditional steel models.
From Farm to Car Since 2000, Ford’s biomaterials team have been working on making sustainable car parts from the farm.  Byproducts from common crops like tomatoes, soybeans and wheat straw help Ford Motor Company make plant- based components strong enough to compete against conventional ones.  Since 2008, Ford has put soy foam seats into more than 15 million vehicles in North America.  Today Ford uses soybean-based foam cushions in all North American vehicles – saving approximately 5 million pounds of petroleum annually.
Ford Motor Company's plastics research engineer, Angela Harris, answers a few questions about Ford soy foam at the 2011 Farm Progress Show.