© Dave Immel
Dodge A Series Compact Trucks
This Month’s History Flashback The Dodge A-Series compact trucks: A-100 and A-108
Dodge's first compact trucks - the A-100, or Forward Control line - were brought out in 1964, with the A-100 van coming out first; 10,252 vans were sold in their first two months. The A-100 vans and wagons were popular, but the pick-ups based on them were not quite as impressive in sales. The Forward Control name presumably came from the cab-over design, where the driver was close to the edge of the front bumper. These trucks and vans were sold under both Dodge and Fargo brands. The engine was between the driver and passenger, where it would remain in the B-vans; the vans themselves were short (90 inch wheelbase), but packaging kept them useful. A 108 inch wheelbase model, the A108, was brought out in 1967; it was popular as the basis for camper conversions.
One of the original 16 Hot Wheels cars, brought out in 1968, was based on the Deora show car (below), which was derived from the A-trucks.
Bill “Maverick” Golden drove a modified A-100 truck with a  nitro-powered 426 Hemi (Little Red Wagon) and discovered it would stand up on its rear wheels, as the power overcame the weight of the chassis; he created “wheel standing,” a popular exhibition act that lasted for decades. No actual Hemi A-100 or A-108 trucks were ever sold; most were powered by the slant six engine, ranging from 101 to 145 hp (gross, topping out at perhaps roughly 110 horsepower net), with the LA V8 becoming an option in 1965 (first the 273, later the 318).
Can you say Hot Wheels?
Penned by the California-based Harry Bradley and constructed by the Alexander Brothers of Detroit, the famous Deora was honored with the coveted Ridler Award in 1967. The subject of numerous models, it has since been fully restored to show quality. The Deora is based on the compact Dodge A100 pick-up. The back hatch of a 1960 Ford station wagon served as the windshield.  It was chopped, sectioned, and channeled to create the fully functional, futuristic-looking pick-up.  The engine was moved rearward, out of the cab and into the bed and covered by the hard tonnueau. Entrance into the gold painted custom is achieved by lifting up the windshield, swiveling the lower gate and entering through the front.
Check out more photos below and a video slide show from RM Auctions, where this vehicle was last offered for sale.
Don’t Miss The Video Slide Show Below
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In association with The Lynch Automotive Group 282 E. Wolf Run, Mukwonago WI 53149 | 262-378-3595
© Dave Immel
Dave Immel’s website In association with The Lynch  Automotive Group 282 E. Wolf Run, Mukwonago WI 53149 262-378-3595
Dodge A Series Compact Trucks
Dodge's first compact trucks - the A-100, or Forward Control line - were brought out in 1964, with the A-100 van coming out first; 10,252 vans were sold in their first two months. The A-100 vans and wagons were popular, but the pickups based on them were not quite as impressive in sales. The Forward Control name presumably came from the cab-over design, where the driver was close to the edge of the front bumper. These trucks and vans were sold under both Dodge and Fargo brands. The engine was between the driver and passenger, where it would remain in the B- vans; the vans themselves were short (90 inch wheelbase), but packaging kept them useful. A 108 inch wheelbase model, the A108, was brought out in 1967; it was popular as the basis for camper conversions.
One of the original 16 Hot Wheels cars, brought out in 1968, was based on the Deora show car (below), which was derived from the A-trucks.
Bill “Maverick” Golden drove a modified A-100 truck with a  nitro-powered 426 Hemi (Little Red Wagon) and discovered it would stand up on its rear wheels, as the power overcame the weight of the chassis; he created “wheel standing,” a popular exhibition act that lasted for decades. No actual Hemi A-100 or A-108 trucks were ever sold; most were powered by the slant six engine, ranging from 101 to 145 hp (gross, topping out at perhaps roughly 110 horsepower net), with the LA V8 becoming an option in 1965 (first the 273, later the 318).
Can you say Hot Wheels?
Penned by the California-based Harry Bradley and constructed by the Alexander Brothers of Detroit, the famous Deora was honored with the coveted Ridler Award in 1967. The subject of numerous models, it has since been fully restored to show quality. The Deora is based on the compact Dodge A100 pickup. The back hatch of a 1960 Ford station wagon served as the windshield.  It was chopped, sectioned, and channeled to create the fully functional, futuristic-looking pickup.  The engine was moved rearward, out of the cab and into the bed and covered by the hard tonnueau. Entrance into the gold painted custom is achieved by lifting up the windshield, swiveling the lower gate and entering through the front.
YourCarSalesman.com
This Month’s History Flashback The Dodge A-Series compact trucks: A-100 and A-108